• Mr. Oliver                                                                              509-725-1481 Ext. 4010 (voicemail)
    Davenport High School                                                             Email: coroliver@davenport.wednet.edu

     

     

    Advanced Placement United States History

    2011-2012

     

    Welcome to Advancement Placement U.S. History class. This is a college-level class which follows the format of many undergraduate survey classes. College credit (6 hours) may be obtained if a student scores a 3, 4, or 5 on the AP examination in May. The course emphasizes a critical approach to the study of history. Historiography, or the study of differing viewpoints of major historians is studied in great depth. The use of critical thinking skills plus the application of comprehensive persuasive writing are an integral part of this study of United States history.  The central text for this class is American History: a Survey by Alan Brinkley. Along with the Brinkley text are a series of readings in social history, and several landmark works as required outside reading. As been stressed, this is a college-level class. Reading is assigned in blocks to be completed by the motivated, responsible student. Periodic reading quizzes will be given to ensure you are completing this task. Discussions are far-ranging and do not replace the necessary independent reading. The major goal of this program is to instill a deep understanding of the flow of history and, in consequence, allow the students to score well on the AP U.S. History national examination on May 11th.

     

     

    Required Readings

    1.  Brinkley, Alan. American History: A Survey, Boston: McGraw-Hill. 14th edition, 2012

        (textbook)

    Selected sections:

    2.    A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn

    3.    A History of the American People by Paul Johnson

    5.    The Reckless Decade: America in the 1890s by H.W. Brands

    6.    Coming of Age in Mississippi by Anne Moody

    7.    American Colonies: The Settling of North America by Alan Taylor

    9.    A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn

    10.  The Americans by Daniel Boorstin

    11.  Kaplan’s AP U.S. History 2012-test prep

    12.  American Creation by Joseph Ellis

    13.  The Peculiar Institution by Kenneth Stampp

    14.  Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World  by David Brion Davis

    15.  Digital History On line Textbook:  http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/database/hyper_titles.cfm

     

     

    Primary/Secondary Source Supplements

    1.   The American Spirit Vols. I-II by David M. Kennedy and Thomas A. Bailey

    2.   HistoryTeacher.net http://historyteacher.net/AHAP/AHAPCourseMainPage.htm

    3.   History Matters: The US Survey Course on the Webs http://www.historymatters.gmu.edu/

    4.   Gilder Lehrman Institute http://www.gilderlehrman.org/

    5.   Additional articles and handouts

     

     

    Grading

    Your academic grade is a percentage determined by dividing the number of points you earn by the total number of points possible each quarter.

    90 - 92% = A-
    87 - 89% = B+
    83 - 86% = B
    80 - 82% = B-
    77 - 79% = C+
    73 - 76% = C
    70 - 72% = C-
    67 - 69% = D+
    63 - 66% = D
    60 - 62% = D-
    0 - 59%   = F

     

    →Grades are updated regularly and are always available online. 

    →PLEASE KEEP ALL ASSIGNMENTS.  If I have made a mistake in recording your scores and you have the scored work, I will gladly correct my mistake

     

    Material Requirements

    Students are expected to bring the following materials to class everyday:

    Pen or pencil, notebook paper, textbook—every day!—and whatever other materials we are currently studying. I will provide paper for in-class writing assignments.

     

     

    Notebook Requirements

    Each student should keep and maintain an APUSH notebook. The notebook must be a fairly large three ring binder w/ a set of dividers. It should be organized by each unit in the following fashion:

    Section 1-Textbook notes (by unit)

    Section 2-Unit Study Guides (terms and questions) and Chapter Study Guides

    Section 3-Essays, FRQ’s, other writing assignments

    Section 4-DBQ’s and primary source work only

    Section 5-Charts, maps, homework and miscellaneous, by unit

    Students who do not keep accurate notebooks are more likely to fail or have low grades; tests and quizzes are based on some material covered in class and if the student has not taken notes, he or she will have less material to study in preparation for the tests and quizzes.

     

     

    Class Rules/Expectations

    All students are responsible for maintaining appropriate behavior in class at all times. There are a

    few simple rules and expectations for students to remember when coming to class:

    1. Participate actively in all class discussions and take notes during class

    2. Be in your seat when the bell rings and be prepared.

    3. There is NO talking while I or another student is speaking.

    4. Students are expected to respect themselves, their classmates and their teacher.

    5. Students are expected to come to class prepared everyday.

    6. Do not sleep in class.

    8. CELL PHONES ARE TO BE TURNED OFF OR IN SILENT MODE

     

     

    Assignments

    Discussion/Lecture Notes:  My job is to set the text into a wider and deeper context.  This will come through   lecture and in-class discussion.  Be prepared to take notes every day.

    Come to class prepared to participate in and LEAD discussions. Discuss means not only to answer questions about the material, but also to have a point of view and raise questions on your own. Be involved!

     Homework:  Plan for frequent homework.  Be prepared to work on outside reading assignments, outlining, chapter and unit reviews, and any other required material.

    Cornell Notes:  Cornell notes must be completed for every chapter in the text.  Due dates are noted on your calendar.  Plan on reading one chapter per week throughout the year (including holidays).  Late work will be docked 50%

    Your notes should be your own.  Copying, or paraphrasing another’s notes is not acceptable.

    Cornell notes will be scored on their completeness:

    1 = 25 points          2 = 50 points          3 = 75 points

    Outside Readings:  I will assign one outside reading of 20 to 60 pages each quarter. You are to do this as homework and thoroughly fill out an outside reading form on that reading.

    The outside reading is due when the bell rings at the beginning of class on the last Friday of each quarter. These may not be turned in late.

     

    Supplemental Readings:  Various readings will be given in addition to the textbook.

     

     

     

    Essays:  You will learn how to write effective AP essays and you will have document-based, in-class assignments that will build these skills.

    All essays are to be done in-class and will be timed as they are on the AP exam: 60 minutes for Document Based Questions (DBQs) and 35 minutes each for Free Response Questions (FRQ).

    DBQs are worth 200 points; FRQs are worth 100 points.

    All essays are graded on a 9 point AP rubric.

    It is your responsibility to produce a legible essay.  Illegible essays will not be accepted.  Any essay more than one week late will not be accepted.

     

    Extra Work:  You may NOT earn extra work unless all assigned work in the quarter is completed.

     

    You may earn a maximum of 100 points of extra work in each quarter by doing projects from an approved list.

     

    All extra work points must be in and recorded before the last week of the quarter. The deadline will be posted and there will be no exceptions to this deadline.

    A typical week...will involve lecture/discussion, document analysis, map assignments, and writing assignments.  In addition, students will be required to conduct individual research and creative projects.

     

    Assessment   The testing schedule is noted on the calendar.

    Chapter Tests:  There will be a test for every chapter in the textbook.  It will consist of a combination of multiple choice and short answer questions.  Tests are given on the days when your Cornell notes are due.

    Tests are scored on a flat percentage acquired by dividing the number correct by the total number of questions on the test.

    Tests must be taken consecutively; i.e. you must take the chapter 21 test before the  chapter 22 test.

    If you miss class on a test day you must make up the test the next school day.  If you do not make up the test promptly, you will be docked 50%.  Work  not made up within one week will not be accepted.

     

    Unit Tests:  A FRQ will serve as the unit test (3 chapters).  At the end of each unit you will write a free response essay on the material covered in those chapters.

    You will have a choice of essay prompts and each of these essays will be scored on a 9-point rubric.  Each essay will be worth 100 points.

    You will be able to use your Cornell notes to write the essay.

    Late Work

    Unless a student has an excused absence, LATE WORK WILL BE REDUCED TO 50% UP TO ONE WEEK PAST THE DUE DATE.  Anything later will not be accepted.  I acknowledge and understand that extenuating circumstances may dictate an extension (will be resolved case-by-case).  My goal in class is to teach individual responsibility and prepare students for the real world.

     

     

    Make-up work

    I post all assigned work (written and reading) on my webpage. It is updated on a

    daily basis. It is YOUR RESPONSIBILITY to obtain this information. I will not remind you to

    turn in any make-up work since this is your responsibility to do so. For each day missed you will

    have that number of days, plus one, to make-up your work. This criteria does not apply to preannounced quizzes and tests. (see below for procedure on making up tests and quizzes).

    REMEMBER, YOUR ABSENCE MUST BE EXCUSED IN ORDER FOR ANY MAKE UP WORK TO COUNT FOR A GRADE!!!!

     

    IF YOU ARE ABSENT ON THE DAY OF AN ANNOUNCED QUIZ OR TEST, THE

    ABSENCE MUST BE EXCUSED FOR YOU TO MAKE IT UP AND HAVE IT COUNT

    FOR A GRADE. YOU MAY ONLY MAKE UP A TEST/QUIZ BEFORE OR AFTER

    SCHOOL. I STRONGLY ADVISE THAT YOU ARE PRESENT THE DAY A QUIZ OR

    TEST IS GIVEN. YOU ARE EXPECTED TO MAKE UP A TEST/QUIZ UPON YOUR

    RETURN TO CLASS.

     

     

    Tardiness

    Students are late if they are not SEATED in their ASSIGNED seat when the bell rings.

    Obviously, official notes written by a school employee (i.e.., administrator, other

    teachers, school resource officer etc…) will excuse the student for being tardy, although the student is still responsible for any work missed.

     

    Cheating Policy

    Cheating constitutes the following:

    Copying another students homework

    Letting another student copy your homework

    Plagiarism

    Receiving from another student information on a test, quiz or essay and using that

       information for your benefit

    Informing other students of material that is contained on a test, quiz or essay

    Copying answers from another student’s paper during a quiz or test

    A student will receive a zero on the assignment in question for any violation of the above

    situations.

     

Last Modified on September 1, 2011